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Hospitality implications of the revolution in consumption:marketing simulacrity

Hospitality implications of the revolution in consumption:marketing simulacrity and hyperreality

This article explores a number of the
implications of the transformation from modern
to postmodern societies for hospitality
organizations and consumers.
The article argues that postmodern consumers
demand different types of hospitality products
and use them in a variety of ways, thus
presenting hospitality companies with new
opportunities which can only be realized if
marketers understand who these consumers are
and how they think, feel and behave.
Postmodern consumers change their
self-concept over very short periods of time, and
consequently it is essential that hospitality
companies of the future recognize this
characteristic of postmodern consumers and
develop products that address their needs.
One result of a move to postmodern
consumption within hospitality is the increasing
tendency among consumers to replace an
extant reality with one that is simulated, or
indeed one that is hyperreal.
The new settings for hospitality consumption are
important in themselves, in terms of what they
say about contemporary hospitality consumers.
However, they are also important because of
the central role they play in sustaining the
contemporary phenomena of hyperconsumption
The transformation to a postmodern hospitality
industry
This article examines some of the ways in which deep societal
and economic changes are transforming contemporary hospital-
ity consumers, and will continue to do so in the future. It explores
a number of the implications of the transformation from modern
to postmodern societies for hospitality organizations and con-
sumers, based on the premise that if the societies of developed
countries are fundamentally changing then it follows that
hospitality organizations, embedded as they are in social pro-
cesses, will also have to be different, particularly in terms of the
ways in which they understand hospitality consumer behaviour.
The importance of this change is so significant because it
represents a radical new way of viewing consumption, including
that of hospitality products, as Baudrillard (1998: ix) states: ‘it has
to be made clear from the outset that consumption is an active
form of relationship (not only to objects, but also to society and to
the world), a mode of systematic activity and global response
which founds our entire cultural system’.
As Burke (2000: 274) argues, ‘as manufacturing societies,
driven by production technologies, give way to service societies,
driven by knowledge and information technologies, capitalism is
being transformed into an economy of icons. New types of
hospitality consumers are beginning to emerge’. Postmodern
consumers demand different types of hospitality products and
use them in a variety of ways, thus presenting hospitality
companies with new opportunities, which can only be realized if
marketers understand whom these consumers are and how they
think, feel and behave. As we have seen in earlier articles it is
argued that traditional modernist consumers consume brands,
goods and services in order to aid them in finding and
reinforcing a unitary or essential self-concept, while postmodern
consumers mix and match eclectic images in a variety of ways.
Postmodern consumers change their self-concept over very short
periods of time and, consequently, it is essential that hospitality
companies of the future recognize this characteristic of post-
modern consumers and develop products that address their
needs.


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  • Delete Guest (Dec 2 2010 09:28:14, Rate: 5 )

    Rate 5 Points
  • Delete Quote Guest (Dec 2 2010 09:28:01, Rate: 0 )

    I love this article, but then again I would I wrote it. It has been lifted straight from my textbook Understanding the Hospitality Consumer. It forms chapter 9 of my book, go ahead and read the rest. Shame on the 'authors' of the article for not giving credit where it is due!
 

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